Charleston, SC contractor, Ryan Jackson, owner of Jackson Construction, LLC is well aware of how scary it can be having a child come in contact with lead paint. A few years back as Mr. Jackson was renovating his current residence, he and his wife discovered that their eldest daughter, then a baby, had chewed on a window stool. Immediately Mr. Jackson took action and followed the steps he had learned when he became a certified lead renovator.

Following the step by step guide listed in the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control Mr. Jackson eliminated any and all lead dangers in his home and felt compelled and a sense of obligation to inform all of his clients of the health risks that lead paint can and would cause if not taken care of. According to this guide, Most homes built before 1978 contain some lead-based paint, but Lead based paint is more common and was used more extensively in homes built before 1950, which have a higher concentration of lead.

According to the American Council on Science and Health, lead continues to receive as much attention as any modern environmental health risk and some would still characterize lead as America’s leading environmental health concern. Children are more sensitive than adults to the effects of lead and precaution should be taken to eliminate childhood exposure. A small amount of exposure is not to be ignored being that it can cause permanent damage to the brain and nervous system, leading to behavior and learning problems, lower IQ, and hearing problems, slowed growth and Anemia.

The fact remains that the health risk associated with lead paint is prevalent not only for homeowners and their health, but for those that are working to correct the problem and the more educated in lead paint safety one becomes, it will in turn benefit everyone involved. Below is a link the the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. Mr. Jackson strongly believes that Whether you are planning on renovating or building a home, taking the right safety precautions will lead to a happier and healthier home.

Copy and page in your browser:
http://www.hud.gov/offices/lead/training/LBPguide.pdf
There are certain guidelines to correctly removing lead based areas from your home. Please take a moment and read through the above listed guide to properly remove these areas. If you should have any further questions or concerns, please feel free to contact Mr. Ryan Jackson directly at (843) 452-2272.

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